Hot Dog Etiquette

The Bombdiggity Cart

The Bombdiggity Cart

Dos and Don’ts: Everyday guidance for eating America’s favorite food

Don’t…
put hot dog toppings between the hot dog and the bun. Always “dress the dog,” not the bun.

Condiments should be applied in the following order: wet condiments like mustard and chili are applied first, followed by chunky condiments like relish, onions and sauerkraut, followed by shredded cheese, followed by spices, like celery salt or pepper.

Do…
serve sesame seed, poppy seed and plain buns with hot dogs. Sun-dried tomato buns or basil buns are considered gauche with franks.

Don’t…
use a cloth napkin to wipe your mouth when eating a hot dog. Paper is always preferable.

Do…
eat hot dogs on buns with your hands. Utensils should not touch hot dogs on buns.

Do…
use paper plates to serve hot dogs. Every day dishes are acceptable; china is a no-no.

Don’t…
take more than five bites to finish a hot dog. For foot-long wiener, seven bites are acceptable.

Don’t…
leave bits of bun on your plate. Eat it all.

Fresh herbs on the same plate with hot dogs are a major ”

Don’t…” Mustard, relish, onions, cheese and chili are acceptable.

Don’t…
use ketchup on your hot dog after the age of 18.

Do…
Condiments remaining on the fingers after eating a hot dog should be licked away, not washed.

Do…
use multi-colored toothpicks to serve cocktail wieners. Cocktail forks are in poor taste.

Don’t…
send a thank you note following a hot dog barbecue. It would not be in keeping with the unpretentious nature of hot dogs.

Don’t…
bring wine to a hot dog barbecue. Beer, soda, lemonade and iced tea are preferable.

Don’t…
ever think there is a wrong time to serve hot dogs.

Do… Check out more on hot dog catering

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The Hot Dog Guy, And The Recession

The Hot Dog Cart

The Hot Dog Cart

Once upon a time, not long ago there was a guy, who had worked a good many years as a car salesman. Lately he had come to dislike his work.  It was not rewarding, his boss was never happy, and there was always pressure and stress. But he stayed with it because the money was good, and he had a family to support.  Until, one day, this man decided he had had enough. Because of hard economic times people were not buying cars and so his paycheck got smaller and smaller and he quit.

He took some money out of his retirement, and of all things bought a hot dog cart. Most of his friends and former co workers were not too sure about his decision, but his wife and family supported him and he went for it. He did all the research he could and got the best hot dogs he could find. He always made sure they were fresh and hot and he always had plenty of fresh ketchup, mustard and onions. His cart was new and clean and he kept it that way.

 

From day 1 his business grew, it seems with the recession people were looking for a good deal; they no longer went to the fancy places for lunch, they liked going to the hot dog cart because it was clean and easy to get to, and they always got  their order fast and hot. It didn’t take long before he was making the same kind of money he was at his job. Only now he had no boss, no stress, and best of all he didn’t have to dress up for work!

 

Now the hot dog guy has a couple of carts; one for catering and one for his home town location. Who would have thought you could make living selling hot dogs! The morale to the story is you can live with a recession or create your way out.

To see how the hot dog guy is today check out hot dog catering

Caesar Ate Hot Dogs?

Most people believe that the hot dog was invented some time in the 1800s. However here is a little known fact that you were not taught in history class; Emperor Nero Claudius Caesar’s cook, Gaius in 64 A.D. accidentally forgot to clean a pig before roasting and discovered the intestines puffed, hot with air. He then stuffed with ground venison, ground beef, cooked ground wheat and spices and brought the sausage into history.

In 1484 the frankfurter was developed in Frankfurt, Germany. However there is also a possibility that credit should be given to Johann Georghehner, a butcher from Coburg, Germany, who later introduced it to Frankfurt.

The frankfurters arrived in New York with German immigrants in the 1860’s and were sold from pushcarts in New York City’s Bowery. In 1880 a German peddler, Antonoine Feuchtwanger started selling sausages on the streets of St. Louis, Missouri. At that time, the sausage wasn’t encased in a bun and Feuchtwanger provided people with white gloves to keep them from burning their hands. Customers often kept the gloves for themselves which was not very profitable for Feuchtwanger; finally his wife came up with the idea of a split bun. Feuchtwanger’s brother– in-law, who was a baker made long soft rolls that fit the sausage and so the hot dog and bun were born. He called them „red hots.” People found that this food was convenient, delicious and fun to eat.

In 1893 it became popular at baseball parks. This tradition was begun by the owner of the St. Louis Browns major league baseball team, Chris Von de Ahe. So there is the brief history of America’s favorite food, as with most great inventions it all started by mistake. Just a side note: Americans consume the most hot dogs between Memorial Day and Labor Day. Check out how we do hot dog catering: just the best N.Y. and Chicago dogs on the west coast.

The History Of The Chicago Hot Dog

1933 hot dog stand

1933 hot dog stand

Some Hot Dog historians say that Greek street vendors developed the concoction known as the Chicago Hot Dog in an effort to please various ethnic groups like Germans favoring sausage and mustard. Then there is the famous Fluky story:

 The “banquet on a bun” had its origins in the Great Depression, when greengrocer Abe Drexler decided his 18-year-old son, local sports hero Jake “Fluky” Drexler, needed an occupation. That was in 1929, when jobs were hard to find, so Drexler converted the family’s Maxwell Street vegetable cart into a hot-dog stand, and began offering the “Depression Sandwich,” which sold for a nickel.

 The “Chicago Style” hot dog was born and sold by street cart hot dog vendors during the hard times of the Great Depression. Money was scarce, but business was booming for these entrepreneurs who offered a delicious hot meal on a bun for only a nickel. They’d start with a Vienna Beef hot dog, nestle it in a steamed poppy seed bun and cover it with a impressive combination of toppings: yellow mustard, bright green relish, fresh chopped onions, juicy red tomato wedges, a kosher-style pickle spear, a couple of spicy sport peppers and finally, a dash of celery salt. This unique hot dog creation with a “salad on top” and its memorable interplay of hot and cold, crisp and soft, sharp and smooth, became America’s original fast food and a true Chicago institution.

 Today you can still get a Chicago style dog at Fluky’s if you are in Chicago. Or if you are on the West coast check out  how we do hot dog catering